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of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. m
the stories. the stories of a dying john marshal holland ii here in a local hospital. dying of spinal cancer, and his clerk, brings him whiskey and cigarettes. the fact that felix died penny less but for the next 15 years his law clerks took care of his wife, marian frankfurter. so whether you're in a torts class or common law class you can never go wrong talking about holmes and it's the same thing talking about law clerks. for holmes, his law clerks were his surrogate children. they were the individuals which had to listen to his stories about the civil war whether they wanted to or not, and holmes had law clerks who walked around in the district of columbia. they wouldn't talk about cert positions. and when corcoran couldn't keep up his end of an argument about dodd and the universe, holme assigned him the task of reading the old testament and coming back so they could continue their argument. so it's those types of stories that captivate me, and i think show an aspect of the supreme court clerkship, which has vanished or is vanishing. so in the 1920 and 30s you had one, maybe who law cle
into the customer pack. i have been working out but check this out. in a john eastman needs to help me. hello. >>guest: i took it to you was about to go over backwards. >>guest: and >>host: knows everything there3 an about televisions and more importantly, nobody knows more about the lp or home theaters than you. there really are the best. >>guest: they make more dlp tepees and in the other manufacturers combined. it is digital light processing and if he could to a movie theater 80 percent in this country do feature premium dlp and of the washington and it was getting quality, grape color saturation in amazing definition, high resolution in your not losing some of the impact you normally would get when you get a lesser technology in the same dlp technology that you find it a movie screen which to be 40 or 50 ft. wide or more, you will the same technology on the 73 in.. >>host: is what this is my favorite television to sell but harris's got a new television in there over the moon but when it bought the television they have to buy the supple for, other stuff but this is out of the box
religious liberty including the ideas of roger williams and john locke and look at how those ideas about equal respect for conscience and the burdens that imposes on government and public policy led to a constitutional tradition according to which government may not substantially burden and an individual's free exercise of religion without an extremely weighty public interest. i defend those ideas as a good basis for public policy in other nations as well. the second prong of my approach of which i will focus tonight is the need for principled consistency and self examination in our approach to the religions of other people. i note that many policies in this area wac socratic self examination. the basic virtue of trying to have a coherent and consistent policy across similar cases and as we will see soon, many are in a deeper way that was at the heart of ethics mainly people act in ways that give their own group special privilege and refuse to apply the same law to all people so we will go on and see that. the third prong of the approach i argue that even when we have good principles and
and then she graduated from pcw, she went to johns hopkins university in baltimore to pursue a master's degree in zoology and spent her summers at the marine biological laboratory in woods hole, which is where this picture is from writer from 1929. carson was thinking about getting her doctorate in either serology or some aspect of biology and she would've had fairly circumscribed opportunities had she done that. there were not a lot of good career paths for women coming out of college with phd's in the late 1920s. she could've taught certainly. certainly at a school like the one she just graduated from, but the future was always an out search and one andy was made doubly so by the onset of the great depression, which of course it at the exact time carson had first graduated from college. after a couple of years at johns hopkins in earning her master's degree in doing a little bit of teaching, she really needed to find work. she was kind of the sole breadwinner in her family. her father had mixed success in life and her mother lived with carson for most of her life. a number of relatives alway
studies at johns hopkins university. tom also served as staff on the financial crisis inquiry commission and in my opinion there are a few things i would disagree with the commission's findings one thing i know for certain is the commission's report was stronger because of tom's involvement. the book is also informed largely by tom's experience on commission staff. we are fortunate to have with us alex pollock to offer his thoughts on the book. alex is resident fellow at the american enterprise institute. i got to know alex a decade ago when he was president and chief operating officer of the bank of chicago from 1991 from 2004 and i would also say i always found him to be one of the most insightful commentators on the financial service industry so with that i turn the podium over to thomas stanton. >> thanks very much, mark. good afternoon. i think it is acting in. it is a pleasure to join you today at the cato institute. i am extremely grateful to kato and want to express my thanks. years ago i wrote a monograph that raised questions about the financial soundness of fannie mae and fred
have heard that many times. [laughter] it works. it got me out of john stossel's apartment. [laughter] but then he asked me to come back in and we had coffee. we played some janke. the big point and there a lot of points in the book but the big point is everything sensible becomes mean and everything bad becomes justified under the rubric of tolerance. so the joke about taking your pants off in the library is not tolerable, saying i don't want that happening is narrowminded. so that is where we are today. we are in a world where common sense is considered wrong. or outmoded, irrelevant, bad, blah, blah, blah. i want to talk about the fact that i'm here the reagan library which is kind of amazing. out of all the presidents i have met, he is my favorite. [applause] he is the only, the only president i have met. but i want to tell you about -- i don't know many people who have met him and i was very lucky. in 1987, 88 i worked for a magazine called "the american spectator." do was run by an interesting guy. my job was picking up the seriousness. i won't get into this further because we a
but it is a type coin. what it says pedigree to john w. kluge she is one of those coin collectors and history and i came out of his collection because he purchased a bunch of them so it is pedigreed to hamhim. >>host: % only less than a dozen of those to round and now we have the 2012 pr69 bags s-mint proof silver eagle dollar coin item #231-6 and it is $129.95 with reflects payment of $43.32. is also very limited is the sampras's o-mint proof silver eagle dollars and we've had this before my it was very popular. >>guest: % approved silver eagle dollars and it is very popular coins and they are in the original governmentng and 4 years of1992 and 2012. >>host: these are also my favorite and yours as well we have these back in stock and a third of the quantity is already spoken for the is only 65 left. it 1991 mount rushmore prestige proof you get these at 3 flex pay net of $33.32. >>guest: is america's only buffalo coin is the seventh of anniversary surely this set be, more collectible and more desirable >>host: hopefully miasmas of watching you us. this will be perfect to put underneath t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8